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Boz

Super moon!

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Boz

I took this photo of the moon last night as it was very clear in my area, it wasn't blue or red but it was quite big!

The better half bought me a new camera for Xmas, and I froze my cods off in the garden! It took ages playing with the settings to get a decent image using a 70-300mm VR lens, without a tripod. I haven't got around to reading the manual yet!

I've cropped the image, but that's it no filters, Photoshop or other trickery used.

A decent tripod plus UV and polarised filters are on my to buy list! 

m.thumb.jpg.2d3ad31e0fa5ad3bbfad0fdc8b818ca0.jpg

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The Guru

Pretty darned impressive there @Boz I've never managed to get any moon photography working for me at all.

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Boz

Thanks mate, it was just a matter of getting the shutter speed and ISO right using manual settings, but it took a while. The lens I used has fast automatic focus and the VR means vibration reduction, so anti shake in reality. Hence the better shot.

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The Guru

I still can't get my head around the shutter speeds and ISO's, I know the theory, but just like reading music it won't stick in there!

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Boz

It's all new to me too mate!!

As far as I know ISO is the light you allow in the lens, so the lower the ISO number the less light is let into the lens, hence the bright moon last night needed a low ISO. Or it would have looked like a white orb at a higher ISO.

The shutter speed is the speed at which the lens opens and closes, so I used quite a fast shutter speed to capture the image quickly. Don't forget the moon is moving pretty fast when you zoom in on it! It's the same with motion shots such as motorsports, you need a fast shutter speed to capture the image without blurriness.

As far as I know so far it's about getting the exposure (ISO) and shutter speed right. It's ok to use auto in everyday shots but photos can be so much better if you set the camera up for the conditions.

I'm new to all of this so it's going to be a steep learning curve that's for sure, but fun I hope!

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The Guru

If you are new to it you did well mate. Photography classes are one thing we have planned to do together when we retire.

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Michael_Mcr

A combination of shutter speed and lens aperture opening is what controls the amount of light getting into the camera. The ISO rating is the sensitivity of the sensor or film to that burst of light.

You will notice that most of the settings progressively double in size, so you use a combination of them to get the right amount of light entering the camera, for the effect you want to achieve.

With shutter speed it will go downwards in duration from (say) 2 sec, 1 sec, half second, quarter second , eighth of a second, 16th second, 32nd second, 64th second, 128th second and so on , with each step halfing the amount of time that light is allowed into the camera.

Aperatures are the similar and the numbers represent the size that the aperature is reduced to. They are a fractional expression of the width of the lens.

So f1/1.8 would be nearly fully open and then it closes down the aperature in steps (for instance) f4, f8, f16, f32.  F64 would be virtually fully closed, letting in only a pinprick of light.

You pick the shutter speed to give you the effect you want and then pick a suitable aperture to give correct exposure …. Or the other way round, depending if shutter speed effects or aperature depth of field effects are what you want in that particular pic.

The two settings corrolate, so lets say that for a particular picture the light meter tells you to use an aperature of f8 and a shutter speed of 1/125 second.

However you want to use an aperature of f16, to get a particular effect. The correct shutter speed would now be 1/64 second, because f16 aperature lets in half as much light as f8, so you have to leave the shutter open twice as long to compensate. It works the other way round too – if you want a different shutter speed, then you have to use a different aperature to compensate.

Finally ISO stands for International Standards Organisation, replacing ASA (American Standards Association) which used to be used for film stock.

ISO is a measure of the overall sensitivity of the film or film sensor and this effects the overall readings that the light meter suggests. Again it is proportional so that a film or sensor rated at 100 ISO is half as sensitive to light as one rated at 200, which is half as sensitive as 400 and so on. In the old days you had to swap the roll of film, but digital cameras allow you to adjust the ISO on the fly.

It has always been the case that the higher the ISO or ASA, the more susceptible the film or sensor is to noise speckling in the final picture, so you should use the lowest ISO possible.

Phew ! Hope that helps. It is what I can remember of 8 years working for Kodak when I left college, before I got into IT proper. :wub:

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The Guru

Yeez head well and truly boiled again. Makes sense as does musical notation, but looking to put that into practice..... no chance LOL, not without a light meter anyway! 

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Boz

Thanks for taking time out to write that up Mike, it makes a lot more sense now.

I think I need a DSLR Cameras for Dummies book! 

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The Guru

LOL we could all use one of those...

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Michael_Mcr

First of all set the ISO to 200 and decide what overall effect is most important in your shot: There are 4 main ones:

High Shutter speed = "Freeze" "Sharpness"

Low Shutter speed = "Blur" "Sense of movement"

Big Aperature = narrow focus area with blurred background to isolate and emphasize the subject

Small Aperature  = wide focus area with sharpness from near to far, to emphasize the whole scene

Once you have picked the appropriate shutter speed or aperature for the effect you want, then see what other setting the camera suggests for that picture and from that, decide if you need to change the ISO or not to get the copmbination of settings that gives you the effect that you want. For most purposes, i leave ISO at 200 if i am able, because its usually gives the best quality images.

 

 

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Boz

Yep got that now, cheers again Mike. :)

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